John William Godward
John William Godward's
Oil Paintings

John William Godward Museum
9 August 1861-13 December 1922, was an English painter.

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John William Godward
A Priestess
Une pretresse 1894
ID: 67829

John William Godward A Priestess
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John William Godward A Priestess


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John William Godward

English 1861-1922 Godward was a Victorian Neo-classicist, and therefore a follower in theory of Frederic Leighton. However, he is more closely allied stylistically to Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, with whom he shared a penchant for the rendering of Classical architecture, in particular, static landscape features constructed from marble. The vast majority of Godward's extant images feature women in Classical dress, posed against these landscape features, though there are some semi-nude and fully nude figures included in his oeuvre (a notable example being In The Tepidarium (1913), a title shared with a controversial Alma-Tadema painting of the same subject that resides in the Lady Lever Art Gallery). The titles reflect Godward's source of inspiration: Classical civilisation, most notably that of Ancient Rome (again a subject binding Godward closely to Alma-Tadema artistically), though Ancient Greece sometimes features, thus providing artistic ties, albeit of a more limited extent, with Leighton. Given that Classical scholarship was more widespread among the potential audience for his paintings during his lifetime than in the present day, meticulous research of detail was important in order to attain a standing as an artist in this genre. Alma-Tadema was, as well as a painter, an archaeologist who attended historical sites and collected artefacts that were later used in his paintings: Godward, too, studied such details as architecture and dress, in order to ensure that his works bore the stamp of authenticity. In addition, Godward painstakingly and meticulously rendered those other important features in his paintings, animal skins (the paintings Noon Day Rest (1910) and A Cool Retreat (1910) contain superb examples of such rendition) and wild flowers (Nerissa (1906), illustrated above, and Summer Flowers (1903) are again excellent examples of this). The appearance of beautiful women in studied poses in so many of Godward's canvases causes many newcomers to his works to categorise him mistakenly as being Pre-Raphaelite, particularly as his palette is often a vibrantly colourful one. However, the choice of subject matter (ancient civilisation versus, for example, Arthurian legend) is more properly that of the Victorian Neoclassicist: however, it is appropriate to comment that in common with numerous painters contemporary with him, Godward was a 'High Victorian Dreamer', producing beautiful images of a world which, it must be said, was idealised and romanticised, and which in the case of both Godward and Alma-Tadema came to be criticised as a world-view of 'Victorians in togas'.  Related Paintings of John William Godward :. | Endymion | Campaspe | Tranquillity | Idle Thoughts | Idle Thoughts |
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Isaac Fuller
c.1606--72 English painter. He was renowned in his day for large historical, mythological and biblical subjects but was also a very able portrait painter. According to Vertue, he studied under Fran?ois Perrier in France c. 1630, and in 1644 he is documented as working in Oxford, at the same time as William Dobson. There he painted altarpieces, including a Resurrection for All Souls College (a wild imitation of Michelangelo, which John Evelyn considered 'too full of nakeds for a chapel'), a Last Judgement for Magdalen College and a Last Supper for Wadham College. None of these works is known to survive. He also copied Dobson's Beheading of John the Baptist, substituting the heads with portraits of his friends. On moving to London, Fuller worked on decorative schemes for churches, taverns and private houses and continued to paint portraits. In 1654 he published a drawing book, Un libro di disegnare, with 15 etched plates, but there are no known copies. Much of his decorative work was destroyed in the Great Fire in 1666, including that in the Painters' Hall and St Mary Abchurch. Vertue admired his erotic life-size Bacchic figures in the Mitre Tavern in Fenchurch Street. Five crudely painted canvases commemorating the Adventures of Charles II after the Battle of Worcester in 1651 (London, N.P.G.) are his only surviving decorative works. Fuller's reputation as a painter rests mainly on three variants of a Rembrandtesque Self-portrait (1670; Oxford, Bodleian Lib.; Oxford, Queen's Coll
John Peter Russell
(16 June 1858 -22 April 1930) was an Australian impressionist painter. John Peter Russell was born at the Sydney suburb of Darlinghurst, the eldest of four children of John Russell, a Scottish engineer, his wife Charlotte Elizabeth, nee Nicholl, from London. J. P. Russell was a nephew of Sir Peter Nicol Russell. After his father's death J. P. Russell enrolled at the Slade School of Fine Art, University College, London, on 5 January 1881 and studied under Alphonse Legros for three years.Russell then went to Paris to study painting under Fernand Cormon. (His fellow students there included Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Émile Bernard.) Russell was a man of means and having married a beautiful Italian, Mariana Antoinetta Matiocco, he settled at Belle Île off the coast of Brittany, where he established an artists' colony. He would have 11 children with Matiocco, of whom six survived. John Peter Russell: Vincent van Gogh, 1886, Van Gogh Museum, AmsterdamRussell had met Vincent van Gogh in Paris and formed a friendship with him. Van Gogh spoke highly of Russell's work, and after his first summer in Arles in 1888 he sent twelve drawings of his paintings to Russell, to inform him about the progress of his work. Claude Monet often worked with Russell at Belle Île and influenced his style, though it has been said that Monet preferred some of Russell's Belle Île seascapes to his own.
CONGNET, Gillis
Flemish painter (b. ca. 1538, Antwerpen, d. 1599, Hamburg) Flemish painter. The son of a goldsmith of the same name, he trained as a painter with Lambert Wenselyns ( fl 1553) and possibly also with Antoon van Palermo (1503 or 1513-c. 1589), an Antwerp art dealer in whose house he lived (van Mander). In 1561 he became a free master in the Antwerp Guild of St Luke. Shortly afterwards he travelled to Italy, going first to Naples and Sicily and then to Terni, where he made frescoes with a painter named Stello. In 1568 he was registered as a member of the Accademia in Florence. He must have returned to Antwerp in 1570, for between that year and 1585 his name appears in the register of the city's Guild of St Luke, of which he became Dean in 1585. A year later, on the arrival of Alessandro Farnese,






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